Team Work – Lessons from animal Kingdom

Lessons from Animal Kingdom – Serengeti
We seven of us from college took a Safari trip to Serengeti – which shall never die – and Grongoro crater. A few interesting lessons.
1 (See picture of Gnus which looks like a long line of Ants). We saw a long march of Gnus in G’ro. All of them one behind the other no jostling, wresting, trying to out-champion the other, no overtaking, almost equidistant from each other. May be 1-2 mile long. They were grazing on one side and crossing over to some other distant place for water of  fresh pasture. They would be grazing one minute and as if there token number had been called, abandon it swiftly and scamper and join the queue and continue their walk along the st line.

Gnus have been made fun of – as a creation when God had a few spare parts left but not the brain after creating all animals. It has the tail of a horse, torso of a cow, face of a bull, mane of a half adolescent lion, and the gait of a Hyena. Quite ugly looking.

But the Military discipline they demonstrated … well i would like them to come and teach Delhi vehicle owners the grace, functionality and benefits of discipline and perhaps anywhere in India the fruits of proper queuing. Cant figure out who is there leader and how he enforces such order.
Ironically we have the gall to call them Wild(e)beasts!!!

2 (Look at the Picture of Zebras- left extreme – some looking one way and others walking in the opposite direction). This was on the morning in Serengeti. We first sighted several Zebras and soon realised as we kept driving it was a whole colony or perhaps County of zebras – may be 20,000-30,000 of them… as much as the eyes could see and where the horizon threatened to meet the plains.
Soon realised they were queuing. There was a small pond on the other side of the road to where the Zebras are pictured standing. The pond must have been a part of a subterranean stream which has surfaced into a small pond in an irregular shaped rectangle of may be 15-20 feet (see picture) which could be accessed only from one side the other side bund being a little high.
One after the other the Zebras were trouping towards the pond to take their may be 30-40 seconds to drink water and return to the grazing side. The pool could max accommodate 15-20 heads at a time … so one after the other as if in a Tripathy Drashan they took their turn. There was a maximum of 15-20 drinking from the pond at a time, may be an equal number behind them and not many risking being on the road…
Again no jostle, no quarrels and no queue jumping, no nudges, no necking (do u see any in the picture?) … I don’t even remember them bleating ..
Such a large colony could not have been from single or a few groups, they must have been several groups but nevertheless the discipline and lack of friction was astounding! If you don’t believe me please verify it yourself next time your are there and observe them in the morning, during dry season (wet weather would make more streams available and hence you may not be able to see this).
Just the assurance that the water from the stream will not dry up seems to have assured them that they can patently await their turn.
Hats off to the Zebras!.

3 Early afternoon we saw two lions on a rock or rather the heads of two. We slowly moved around and found that it was a pride of 19 (as correct as we could be)  – equally split between grown ups and cubs. We soon saw a couple of lionesses approaching them. Don’t know what was the message … but the pride lying down and relaxing … all of them started moving in their direction. We moved keeping track over them and at a distance, may be of a Km or less, we could see that a Zebra had been killed by the two (or more) lionesses and they had perhaps come to invite the rest for the feast. (see picture of lions walking towards the kill).

We understood from the guide’s commentary that the lionesses after killing do not drink or eat their kill without the rest of the pack. They have it together. After the kill the two hunters had gone to fetch the others before starting the feast.
From the Guide we could understand that a Zebra would be full meal for may be 6-7 lions. But that shortage (they were 19-20 lions) did not seem to make the two who toiled to kill their prey greedy and desperate and have it first before inviting the rest.
An hour or so later after we had moved on, we heard from the wireless set that the same pride had killed yet another prey.

4 A little after Noon, we chanced upon another colony of various kinds of Deer, antelopes, Impalas, Gerenuk (a kind of deer that never drinks Water), etc. Again countless … may be 10-15,000 and this time along with some zebras, Buffalos, Gnus, etc. We saw a lioness with a blood oozing fresh kill of a deer in its mouth with another lioness walking behind. We must have watched them walk about 200-300 yards purposefully in one direction. With some difficulty dropping the fresh kill every now and them resting a few seconds before picking up and walk another 25-30 yards. And so on. The guide said that they must be walking towards the rest of the pride to share the feast.
Again no attempt by the two which had killed to have their fill first before calling in the others to join, as we understood. May be the pride had their kids also and the mothers felt it their duty to feed them first and hence the long walk and wait … one would not know.

There may be more than a Lion and 4-5 lionesses in a pride and more than 1-2 may be lactating at a time. We were told that the lionesses feed milk to any of the cubs unmindful of whether they the cub is hers or other’s

5 One would not know the origins of this nasty practice with Lion family. In most animal species, the line of succession is clearly specified … the oldest female (elephants), oldest Stallion (Deer), the strongest, etc. But with Lions they settle it with Wars. Detached young adult lions who are themselves driven out of their pack fight it out with older lions with a pride and if the intruders win, they take the pride. At that time they kill the older lions or drive them out. But they kill off all the young cubs less than one year old, we were told.

Lions also lose a lot of their cubs otherwise. When they go for their hunt they try to hide their cubs but the cubs are killed by Hyenas and Leopards. Hence ironically, the survival rate of the Lions is one of the lowest – 3 in 10. What fate the King!!!

6 Young elephants are accompanied by their mother or sometimes male elephants. But then they get tired fast and have to rest or sometimes even sleep off mid way. In such cases the accompanying big one patiently waits over the young one till it wakes up again to walk – be it mid way, mid road, or pathway or marsh. What baby care!

7 All in one frame. (see picture with Lion in front). This is a picture (in G’ro) with a lion and lioness (and there were three more behind anther bush), hippos (looking like rocks), birds, Buffalo may be at 25 yards distance from lions, zebras may be at a distance of 40-50 yards and deer some more distance. In another place we could see a similar frame with some jackals, hyenas and two large tuskers thrown in, all within a max 100 yards square. What peace with each other and harmony. Secure in each others company. Carelessly grazing unmindful about the threat to their life (or may be secure that once the lions have had their days fill, they are harmless creatures). Only Man treats everyone else incl other men of the same ilk (politicians), sometimes spouses, of other religion, sometimes Boss and reportee with total suspicion, mistrust, etc. And lives in permanent fear of the rest.

8 Finally the Hyenas, the much despised creatures. Scavengers we call them. Everday so many animals must be dying in these parks. You can imagine the stench …but you have to only imagine. All the left overs are cleaned up by the Hyenas and jackals leaving no matter leftovers. They can even crush an elephants heads between their Jaws, we ere told. So as soon as any of their jungle cousins finish with left overs they eat of all that is left and digest it within a short time so that there is no stench whatsoever.

Incidentally on the last day we saw 2 Hyenas near some bush may be 200-300 yards away from us. They went inside the bush and after about 2-3 minutes one of them came out of the bush running helter-skelter, desperate, helpless like someone running to escape from a killer/mugger on hot pursuit running in our direction and taking its first breadth after may be quarter mile distance, sad desolate he looked. I asked the guide ‘what happened to the other one?’. ‘Probably there is a lion inside the bush who must have killed him’.
Even the heartless Hyena seems to have a heart for its mate/sibling/friend… whosoever!
Animals should feel entitled to offer us an MBA in team work, I guess. Or perhaps basics of spirituality.
Remove just 2 words – Greed and Individuality – from the English dictionary, and we will have a entirely different harmonious world I guess!

3 thoughts on “Team Work – Lessons from animal Kingdom

  1. Great observation and lessons from nature. the question is can we follow it in out real life. Wish we could Remove the 2 words from our own dictionary, add to that the sense of how others see us. We can be more peaceful.

    Like

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